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    University of Louisiana Lafayette
   
 
  Nov 19, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Academic Catalog

College of Liberal Arts


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Departments and Degree Programs

College of Liberal Arts

Programs

No Degree Awarded

Minor

Department of Communication

Go to information for Department of Communication.

Programs

Bachelor of Arts

Master of Science

Minor

Other Programs

Department of Communicative Disorders

Go to information for Department of Communicative Disorders.

Programs

Bachelor of Arts

Master of Science

Doctor of Philosophy

Department of Criminal Justice

Go to information for Department of Criminal Justice.

Programs

Bachelor of Science

Master of Science

Minor

Department of English

Go to information for Department of English.

Programs

Bachelor of Arts

Master of Arts

Graduate Certificate

Doctor of Philosophy

Minor

Department of History and Geography, and Philosophy

Go to information for Department of History and Geography, and Philosophy.

Programs

Bachelor of Arts

Master of Arts

Minor

Department of Modern Languages

Go to information for Department of Modern Languages.

Programs

Bachelor of Arts

Master of Arts

Post Bachelors Certificate

Doctor of Philosophy

Minor

Department of Political Science

Go to information for Department of Political Science.

Programs

Bachelor of Arts

Minor

Department of Psychology

Go to information for Department of Psychology.

Programs

Bachelor of Science

Master of Science

Minor

Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Child and Family Studies

Go to information for Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Child and Family Studies.

Programs

Bachelor of Science

Bachelor of Arts

Minor

Aims and Objectives

The College of Liberal Arts is composed of nine departments: the Departments of Communication, Communicative Disorders, Criminal Justice, English, Modern Languages, History and Geography, Political Science, Psychology and Sociology, Anthropology and Child and Family Studies. These academic divisions offer major programs in three broad areas of study: the communication areas, the humanities, and the behavioral sciences. Adhering to the principle that advanced and professional studies should be based on a solid foundation of the liberal arts, the College has encouraged the development of programs to meet the needs and interests of individual students. Thus the students enrolled in the College participate in an educationally broadening experience in addition to obtaining needed expertise in an area of specialization. Opportunities to continue into graduate work exist in many individual areas.

Undergraduate Degree Requirements

Areas of Specialization

COMMUNICATION

Mass Communication

Mass communication plays a multiple role in society. Radio, television, newspapers, magazines and media advertising inform, entertain, educate, and provide access to the fine arts. The curriculum in this area recognizes that practitioners in mass communication must draw upon a variety of knowledge and experience to function effectively; thus there are a wide range of specialties offered in this diverse discipline.

Broadcasting students have access to the campus radio station, television studios and multiple lab facilities as well as television field equipment for diverse practical experiences. Journalism and media advertising students have opportunities to work on the staff of the campus newspaper, on various local papers or at broadcast stations. Career opportunities for print journalists include work on newspapers and magazines, and preparation of corporate or government publications or publicity materials. Graduates in broadcasting are in demand in production, in news, and in sales and advertising. The explosion of electronic communication technology suggests an ever expanding field of opportunities for mass communication students. Graduates in media advertising work for newspapers, broadcast stations, ad agencies, and in specialty advertising. All students complete internships prior to graduation.

Organizational Communication

Studies in organizational communication are concerned with spoken communication that affects the behavior of individuals, the functioning of small work and social groups, and the attitudes of entire societies. Pursuit of this curriculum gives students an intellectual understanding of communication and develops their skills in small group communication, problem solving, platform speaking and argumentation. Students desiring a broad-based liberal arts education can use this approach to prepare for later careers in sales, law, personnel, communication consulting, government service, teaching, or the ministry.

Public Relations

The Public Relations curriculum prepares students for the professional practice of public relations in business, corporate enterprises, public administration, trade and professional associations, governmental agencies, or non-profit institutions. (Careful programming allows students to cross departmental and college lines in a series of courses that embraces the humanities, behavioral sciences, and business.) Course work emphasizes persuasive writing and presentation of material, organization of research, problem analysis, and development of effective public relations strategies.

HUMANITIES

The Departments of English, Modern Languages, and History and Geography are primarily responsible for the humanities degree programs at the University. Students majoring in any one of these departments are given, first of all, the opportunity to achieve the breadth of knowledge and vision which the humanities represent and, secondly, the analytical and communication skills to prepare for those professions which require this kind of training. Majors may be pursued in Modern Languages (French/ Francophone Studies and Spanish/Hispanic Studies); in the various areas of British and American literature, language and folklore; in the study of American, European, Latin American, and public history.

Students who elect one of the humanities majors prepare themselves to become knowledgeable citizens of their communities, wherever these communities may be, and to pursue studies in professional and graduate schools. Those who do not wish to pursue further academic work are prepared by their undergraduate studies to engage in a variety of activities in which humanistic training is paramount, such as diplomatic/government services, social services, or corporate business functions.

The Humanities Program

The Humanities Program is an interdisciplinary program which deals with culture in its individual, historical and sociological dimensions. As a discipline, the Humanities courses examine a variety of forms of expression, including art, music, literature, history and philosophy, in order to better understand human values, beliefs and emotions.

The Center for Louisiana Studies

The Center for Louisiana Studies, a research center devoted to the state's history and culture, seeks to interpret historical and cultural data through print and electronic media, pictorial exhibitions, and lecture series. The facilities of the Center are available to anyone interested in the history and culture of Louisiana. This center also houses the Center for Cultural and Ecotourism as well as the Cinematic Arts Workshop.

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

A major in one of the behavioral sciences (anthropology, child and family studies, communicative disorders, criminal justice, political science, psychology and sociology) prepares students for careers in many service professions connected with government, industry, and various social institutions; it also provides the broad educational foundation necessary to enter graduate school.

The Department of Communicative Disorders offers a pre-professional degree that prepares students for advanced studies in communicative disorders. Upon completion of the appropriate level of training, students are prepared to work in schools, hospitals, laboratories, community service centers, and colleges and universities or as industrial consultants or private practitioners.

The degree programs offered by the other behavioral science areas are planned to help students understand the complexity of modern society and its problems. Students are stimulated to search for solutions to these problems by studying the contributions which social scientists have already made towards ameliorating the social conditions of our times.

The pre-law and international relations concentrations are administered by the Department of Political Science. The goal of the pre-law program is to provide students the guidelines for pre-legal education suggested by the Association of American Law Schools, the curriculum is designed as a four-year program leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science with a concentration in Pre-law. The concentration in international relations was created in recognition of the necessity of preparing students for life and work in an increasingly global society. The focus of this interdisciplinary concentration is to develop a broad appreciation for the whole range of international politics, cultures, issues and influences. The program leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science with a concentration in International Relations.

Undeclared Major

The undeclared major is a temporary option for first year students who have not yet decided on a particular major. During the first year, undeclared students are advised to take core courses which fit into all majors. The career counseling and/or testing provided by the professional staff in the Junior Division is recommended for undeclared students, along with the course, ACSK 140 - Selecting A Major .

Undeclared students must declare a major upon the completion of 45 credit hours; failure to declare a major after earning 45 credit hours will result in blocking the student's registration.

Procedures

Admission Requirements

The University regulations on admissions apply to all entering students. All first-time students and re-entry students enter the Junior Division. Students must be in Upper Division in order to receive a degree. In order to enter the Upper Division of the College, a student must have:

  1. completed at least 30 non-developmental hours
  2. earned an adjusted 2.0 GPA
  3. completed ENGL 102 - Writing and Research About Culture  or equivalent with a grade of "C" or better and MATH 103 - Applied College Algebra Fundamentals , or MATH 105 , or equivalent or higher level courses
  4. completed the 101 or higher level foreign language requirement
Non-Resident Credit

After transfer students are admitted to the University, their transcripts are reviewed by the office of the Dean of Liberal Arts, as well as by the department in which they plan to major. The courses which they have completed elsewhere are individually accepted or rejected as applicable towards a particular degree in the College. As specified by the University "repeat rule," a grade earned in a course taken at UL Lafayette may not be substituted for a grade earned at another institution, nor may a grade earned at another institution be substituted for a grade earned at UL Lafayette.

When students transfer into the College of Liberal Arts from another institution, from another college of the University, or when they transfer from one curriculum to another within the College, they must fulfill the catalog requirements in effect at the time of their transfer.

Minimum Continuing Requirements

See University Regulations on academic status.

Specific Degree Requirements of the College
  1. In addition to fulfilling the general requirements for the degree, a student in the College of Liberal Arts is required to complete a minor of at least eighteen hours in an acceptable subject matter field outside his or her area of concentration. The minor area is supervised by the student's major department and must be selected in consultation with the student's academic advisor. The minor may consist of more than eighteen hours; at least six of these eighteen hours must be at the 300/400 level. Note: ENGL 101 Intro to Academic Writing , ENGL 102  and ENGL 115  do not count in the 18 hours for the English minor; MODL 101 does not count in the 18 hours for minors in French, German or Spanish.
  2. A general University requirement is that, in order to be certified for graduation, students must achieve an overall adjusted grade point average of 2.0. The College imposes one additional requirement: that students achieve grades of "C" or better in those courses in their major presented to fulfill the credit hour requirement in that major.
  3. In order to be eligible to receive a degree from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, students pursuing the baccalaureate are required to complete in residence at this University at least twelve semester hours in their major area, six of which must be at the 300/400 level.
  4. No more than 42 of the hours required for graduation shall be taken in the major subject and no more than 64 hours shall be taken in the student's area of specialization.
  5. Superior students may fulfill the basic English requirement in all curricula in several ways. They may receive credit for the CEEB advanced placement program in their high schools; they may qualify for ENGL 115 , or they may qualify for an advanced-standing examination. Students with an English score of 28 or above on the ACT will be placed in ENGL 115  and will receive credit automatically for English 101. Students with a score of 32 or higher on the English section and a composite of 28 or higher are eligible to take an advanced-standing examination conducted by the English Department. Those who pass this examination will receive credit automatically for ENGL 101  and ENGL 102 .
  6. The foreign language should be selected in consultation with the student's academic advisor, and all requirements should be finished prior to the senior year. An advanced placement test is given at the beginning of each semester to students with no college credits in foreign language. On the basis of this test, up to 16 semester hours credit at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette may be earned. Students with two or more years of foreign language study in high school are strongly urged to take advantage of this opportunity to earn university credit and fulfill the language requirement. Students who do not take the advanced placement test before enrolling in a foreign language course will not be eligible to receive this credit later in their college career. Students who do not take the Advanced Placement test in foreign languages should schedule foreign languages according to the recommendations below:
    1. Students with two years of a foreign language taken in the freshman and sophomore high school years should register for 101. With the approval of the Modern Languages Department, they may begin at the 102 level.
    2. Students with two years of a foreign language taken in the junior and senior high school years should begin at the 201 level. With the approval of the Department of Modern Languages, they may begin at the 101 or 102 level.
    3. Students with three or four years of high school foreign language should schedule the terminal course 202 or 203. Any deviations must be approved by the Department of Modern Languages.
  7. The successful completion of the highest numbered foreign language course listed in each curriculum is required. Foreign language courses should be taken in successive semesters.
  8. International students may not schedule for credit towards graduation classes in their native language below the 300 level in French, German and Spanish. The Department of Modern Languages will recommend the placement of international students. With the approval of the advisor, department head and dean, certain courses in English may be substituted for the MODL requirement.
  9. Only 4 credit hours of KNEA may be used towards completing graduation requirements.
  10. Electives (except for free electives) must be chosen in consultation with the student's academic advisor. It should be noted that many of the electives in any curriculum must be chosen at the 300 and 400 levels in order to meet the graduation requirement of 45 hours of upper level courses. The three types of electives are defined below:
    1. Advisor approved electives are any credit courses offered at UL Lafayette except those which are prerequisite to, or which contain subject material on a more elementary level than required courses in the student's curriculum.
    2. College electives are courses chosen from the course offerings of departments within a specified college.
    3. Area electives are courses chosen from the offerings of schools, departments, or specified areas which are defined as follows:
      1. Art, dance, and theatre courses or a list approved by the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and provided by each department.
      2. Communication: CMCN 100 - Principles of Human Communication  CMCN 101 , 203 , 310 ; ENGL 223 , 325 , 326 , 355 , 360 , 365 ; THEA 261 .
      3. Humanities: courses in literature, language, history, and philosophy are offered by the Departments of English, Modern Languages, History and Geography and Philosophy. In addition, HUMN courses fall into this category.
      4. Mathematics: mathematics and statistics courses offered by the College of Sciences must be elected to fulfill the mathematics requirement. Some courses designed for students in elementary education or business curricula are not acceptable in fulfilling this requirement.
      5. Science: courses in biology, chemistry, geology, renewable resources or physics. Science courses devised for elementary education majors and for secondary education majors in non-scientific curricula are not acceptable as science electives. Mathematics, statistics, and computer science courses may not be used to satisfy the science requirement.
      6. Behavioral Sciences: courses from the disciplines of anthropology, criminal justice, economics, geography, political science, psychology, sociology and child and family studies.

Special Procedures

Although the academic rules and regulations printed towards the back of this catalog will usually guide students through their academic careers at the University, some of these rules and regulations appear to require amplification. Several significant problem areas are treated below:

  1. The head of the major department is responsible for assigning students to an academic advisor. Students must consult their advisors on all academic matters and are urged to do so frequently.
  2. Students must follow the curriculum plan presented either in the catalog which was current at the time they began the curriculum they wish to complete or in the catalog in force at the time of their graduation (see the time limitation in "12" below). For example, if a student enrolled in the history curriculum in 1992 and then changed to English in 1994, the appropriate catalog to follow is 1993-95, NOT 1991-93.
  3. Re-entry students who have been out of the University for two regular semesters or more must follow the catalog that is current at the time of their re-enrollment.
  4. Any variation from the courses listed in the student's curriculum must be requested in writing by the student's academic advisor and approved in writing by the department head and dean.
  5. If students are required to take a course below the level of the first course in the subject required by their curricula (for example, English 90 or Math 92), they may not apply credit earned in the lower level course towards graduation.
  6. International students who do not have test scores or a level 6 IEP score must see the ESOL coordinator for placement. International transfer students' transcripts should be sent to the ESOL coordinator for placement. International students who have not graduated from a U.S. high school are required to enroll in ESOL courses instead of ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  to complete their freshman writing requirement. Students must complete the course sequence in the same department (ENGL 101  AND ENGL 102 ; ESOL 101  AND ESOL 102 ).
  7. Students must attain the grade of "C" in English 90, ENGL 101 , and ENGL 102 ; in MATH 92, and in all ESOL courses in order to progress to the next higher course.
  8. When scheduling a course, students should be sure that they have completed all prerequisites listed under the course description. In order to schedule a course which may be taken for graduate or advanced undergraduate credit (indicated by "G"), students MUST have attained junior standing (i.e., completed at least 60 semester hours, excluding remedial courses) and exited junior division.
  9. Students are urged to exercise care when scheduling classes, since changes in their processed schedules may be impossible to make because of closed classes and time conflicts.
  10. Students may drop any class without penalty (i.e., with the grade of W) up until the date specified by the Registrar's office. After that date, no class may be dropped except in extraordinary cases. Students are cautioned to go through the official procedure when dropping a course in order to avoid receiving a failing grade for non-attendance. This procedure is initiated in the Junior Division for Junior Division students and in the Office of the Dean for Upper Division students.
  11. A student may not schedule more than 20 semester hours in a regular semester or more than 10 semester hours in a summer session without WRITTEN PERMISSION of the dean of the college. After obtaining this permission, a student may schedule the maximum semester hour load allowed by the University: 22 semester hours during a regular semester and 12 semester hours during a summer session. Permission to schedule the maximum semester hour load will in large part depend on the student's cumulative grade point average. (See suggested class loads for various cumulative grade point averages presented in this catalog under "Program of Study".)
  12. Students are responsible for submitting a degree plan to the Office of the Dean during the semester immediately preceding the semester or session in which graduation is expected. The maximal period of time for which the provisions of any catalog may be used in preparing a degree plan is five years. Students who began their degree programs six or more years prior to the date of their anticipated graduation must consult the dean to determine which catalog should be used for preparation of the degree plan. Once the degree plan has been accepted, any change must be requested in writing by the student and approved in writing by the dean, the advisor and the department head on forms obtainable in the Office of the Dean.
  13. The degree plan is not to be considered as a substitute for the application for the degree, which is initiated in the Office of the Registrar.
    This application is to be processed by the end of the second week of the semester in which the student plans to graduate.
  14. Students in the College of Liberal Arts may not audit courses they must take for credit (ex: MATH 103  or MATH 105 ) to fulfill requirements of their degrees.

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